Metabolic Types and the Raw Food Diet

QUESTION:

Are you familiar with Metabolic (or more, recently, nutritional) Typing as recommended by doctor Mercola? I suspect that your recommendations are accurate for a carbo type but may not be accurate for protein type or mixed type. Has anybody developed different raw food programs/recommendations for each of the 3 types?

ANSWER:

The concept of metabolic typing is flawed and misleading. The questions used to determine which metabolic “type” a person belongs to are extremely vague and imprecise. Questions such as: “How
do you “feel” after you eat a potato? How do you “feel” after eating meat?”

Yet you could ask all coffee drinker how they “feel” after drinking coffee, and all of them would answer that they get more “energy”. It is a fact that coffee does NOT give someone energy, rather “stimulates” stress in the body by elevating levels of stress hormones.

So how can you determine someone’s metabolic type by simply asking the person how they think they “feel” after eating certain foods?

Here’s what Dr. Joel Furhrman, a respectable nutritional researcher, had to say on the subject:

(Mercola”s) metabolic typing questionnaire is not an accurate way to determine a person’s nutritional needs. When he advises his “protein type” to eat a diet in which most calories are supplied by animal products, he is appealing to that person’s food preferences and addictions. The more you crave something and the worse you feel when you stop consuming it, the more likely that you are addicted to it and that it is harming you, not helping. Encouraging people who are addicted to meat or other animal products to eat more of them will lead to even shorter life spans.

The biggest difference in metabolisms in humans are found between men and women. Yet no one has ever thought of creating two separate diets for the sexes, with a totally different ratio of foods. The only main difference is that in general, men have to eat more food than women.

The reason why the metabolic typing diet seems to work is not because it is based on “science”. Certain recommendations are sound, such as reducing the amount of grains that you eat in favor of more vegetables.

It is a recognized fact that eating a large amount of animal products (including butter and lots of red meat) can cause heart disease and cancer. And even if you think you’re a “protein type”, you won’t be protected.

When raw food promoters take the concept of metabolic typing and apply it to raw foods, they end up promoting a diet very high in fat, as no vegan raw foods is high in protein while not being high in fat.

If you laden your diet with fat, whether from animal OR plant sources, you are setting yourself up for a wide range of health problems, including hypoglycemia other disorders commonly attributed to perfectly natural fruits.


What About The BLOOD TYPE DIET?

QUESTION: I’d just be curious to get your opinion on 2 matters. Obviously, you must get tons of mail and get the same questions all the time… You talked briefly about other diets in your last e-zine, but I was wondering what was your take on the BLOOD TYPE DIET. Given that I’m O+, I’m naturally “supposed” to be a carnivore, so I was wondering if by being vegan, I was going against my body’s natural instincts. Is there any logical and reasonable rationale behind that diet?”

ANSWER:

The blood type diet issue has been discussed before in some articles that I have published. But here’s my take on it: I have a lot of experience studying that diet. In fact, I was even in close contact with one of the foremost promoters of this diet here in Canada. I have read all of the books and been to every website that promotes it.

After reviewing all of that information, I came to the conclusion that the blood type diet is based on very weak evidence. There is no real scientific evidence to prove that certain blood types must eat meat while others should not. It is true that there our blood type is part of our genetic makeup and there is some evidence to show that some blood types are more prone to certain diseases, but there is absolutely no evidence to show that certain blood types should eat totally different diets.

Consider this: different kinds of animals have different kinds of blood types, yet they all eat the same foods. Cats have 11 blood types, and cows about 800 – yet you’ll never see a cow eating like a cat!

There is as much evidence to prove the validity of the blood type diet as there is to prove the validity of astrological predictions. In fact, the idea that our blood type influences our personality is so popular in Japan that people over there ask “What’s your blood type?” like we ask “What’s your sign”?

NOTE: I have a useful full 30-page special report on the Fruit Controversy. If you”d like to read it, you can by subscribing to my ezine. Click here to get the report.