December 28
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Best Books I Read in 2011

I try to stay current with what’s happening in the health and raw food worlds. Every year, I read between 40 and 75 books.

This year, I read close to 60 books. Here are the top books that are making it on top of my list this year. They are not in any particular order.

Super Immunity — By Dr. Joel Fuhrman

Joel Furhman is a great advocate for healthful living. This new book goes in the same direction as his “Eat to Live” series, but this time he focuses on immunity, how to strengthen it and improve it.

The moral of the book is: eat your greens! But that’s only a part of the story.

If you have your doubts about vaccines and their effectiveness, but don’t want to throw the baby with the bath water when it comes to the germ theory and contagious illnesses, you’ll want to to give this book a read.

It’s the best combination of science, alternative health information and nutrition that I’ve come across so far this year.

Vegan for Life, by Jack Norris

I was impressed by “Vegan for Life.” This is not a raw food book per se. In fact, the author definitely does not recommend a raw food diet, but is a vegan advocate. It contains everything you would want to know about a vegan diet in every stage of life.

The nutritional information is top-notch. I don’t agree with all of the advice, but overall “Vegan for Life” is a must read for all vegans.

 

The Shallows: What the Internet is doing to our brains, by Nicholas Carr

Have you noticed that your attention span is shorter this year than say 5 or 10 years ago? You may think that it’s age-related. But, there’s a great amount of research to prove that the way we use the Internet, smartphones and social media is transforming the actual structures and functioning of our brains!

The bottomline: we’ve moved from being able to focus on one thing — linear thinking — to having a very short attention span. A person today can scan through a tremendous amount of information online, but retains very little of it.

The worst part is: once you’ve changed the way you process information on the Internet, it affects how you process ALL information. A must read.

Sleep: a Groundbreaking Guide to the Mysteries, Problems and Solutions, by Carlos Schenck

The book “Sleep” blew my mind. I thought I knew about sleep, but I was wrong.

Have you ever wondered why some people need a lot of sleep, while others don’t? Why are some individuals labeled as “lazy” because they can’t function unless they sleep until 10, while others are up so early that they inevitably pass out early in the evening and can’t function in social gatherings.

We have a lot of misconceptions about sleep. This is a book that explains the common sleep disorders, a lot of them you’ve probably never heard about.

Sleep sex or sleep eating anyone?

The book is fascinating and will help you understand sleep disorders. The solutions provided are mostly pharmaceutical, so you’ll have to look somewhere else for natural answers, but to understand sleep disorders, this is the best book I have read.

Mindless Eating: Why We Eat More Than We Think, by Brian Wansink

This is a new book in a series of books about the science of how we eat. Why, for example, do people inevitably eat more out of large containers, even if the amount of food provided is the same?

This is a fascinating book about how we eat, and why we often overeat. It’s a fun read and I suggest you pick it up immediately if you would like to improve your relationship with food.

Steve Jobs, by Walter Isaacson

Okay, this is not a health book per se. I thought the Steve Jobs biography by Walter Issakson was great. This is probably the book I read the fastest this year!

If you’re fascinated by Steve Jobs, and even want to hear some interesting details about his eating habits, read the book!

 

 

Why Zebras Don’t Get Ulcers, by Robert M. Sapolsky

This is a book on the science of stress, and exactly how it affects us at every level.

As I’m reading this book, I’m realizing how much I’ve minimized the importance of stress-reduction techniques in health.

We focus so much on food and fitness, but stress-management is just as critical. Psychological stress can make us age faster and can affect many aspects of our lives.

This is a serious, scientifically researched book by a respected professor, but it’s also fun to read.

Movie: Forks Over Knives, by T. Colin Campbell

Have you seen the movie Forks Over Knives? So far, I’ve been able to convert many people to a plant-based diet with this movie alone.

There’s also a book available separately, with lots of great recipes for beginners.

This is the perfect gift for someone you care about.

 

 

Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease: The Revolutionary, Scientifically Proven, Nutrition-Based Cure , by Caldwell B. Esselstyn

I only read this bomb by Dr. Esselstyn this year, after my father died of a heart attack in May. Although I knew that a plant-based diet can prevent cardio-vascular disease, I learned a great deal from Dr. Esselstyn’s book.

If you think that olive oil can be “heart healthy,” then you need to read this book. Dr. Esselstyn demolishes this assumption and many others about heart disease, and proves that if you follow his program, your chance of dying of heart disease will effectively be “zero.”

Raw Food Controversies

Okay, can I throw my own book in there? I spent half a year writing this book non-stop, even while traveling around the world, and managed to release it last January.

Initially, the book was going to be only 200 pages. Then it grew to a monstrous 400+ pages!

This is the biggest, most-researched book on the controversies in the raw food world, and I want you to get your hands on it.

If you want to know the full story of how many people have damaged their health following the wrong kind of raw food diet, and what you should eat instead to stay healthy and avoid these problems, read Raw Food Controversies.

Many of my readers told me that once they started reading it, they couldn’t put it down. It’s a combination between a novel and a raw nutrition book! Check it out at www.fredericpatenaude.com/rawfoodcontroversies